On a windy Sunday afternoon on June 11, Dublin residents and their kids gathered in front of the new Boulevard development to protest massive overcrowding in our schools and asking developers to do their part to alleviate this situation. The headwinds the residents faced while holding up their banners was poignant and resembled what the residents have faced with the DUSD board of trustees. Chants of “Buyers Beware…Developers Don’t Care” reverberated through the air while the constant honk from passing cars provided support and encouragement to the brave kids and their concerned parents. The kids as always were incredibly spirited, bright and asked tough questions about what shape their education would take in Dublin. We need to fight for them and their future.

Our very own Mayor David Haubert was kind enough to stop by to meet the protesters and address their questions in an open and honest manner.

Here are some of the highlights from the conversation:

1. City Council role

a. Providing high quality education is second highest priority for the mayor and the city council (security/public safety is the highest)

b. The mayor will call a joint meeting between the city council and DUSD board. He has already called for more liaison meetings.

c. When asked about the timing of a school site at Dublin Crossings he said he would support allowing a longer time horizon, even as much as 10 years. He has never felt we should push the school district to rush building a school there. This is a School District decision.

2. DUSD Board

a. The school Board must take the lead in making the decisions re: education and he respects the sanctity of their agency powers.

b. The mayor supports a 2nd high school in East Dublin, which based on his understanding is an agreed upon and stated objective of the School District. He reiterated that this is a school board decision and he will support the 2nd high school.

c. When asked about the timing of a school site at Dublin Crossings he said he would support allowing a longer time horizon, even as much as 10 years. He has never felt we should push the school district to rush building a school there. This is a School District decision.

d. When asked about the school at Dublin Crossings he said he felt there are confusion and misinformation in the community with some people insinuating that $70MM would be redirected from Measure H. This is not the case. Clearly, developer fees and State of California funding should be available for this.

e. The mayor encouraged residents to have coffee meetings with the individual (or 2) DUSD trustees to make our views clear and have honest and frank conversations about options and challenges.

3. Second Comprehensive High School Site

a. When asked about the possibility of utilizing FSP for a school site I said I would consider it. Again, this would need to be a school board decision to request if they felt it needed to be a topic for discussion. He felt such a move would come with great pain. In his opinion, it is like amputating a limb to save a life. However, he would consider having the discussion.

b. Regarding Chen property, again the city council would be open to discussing it with the school board should the board request discussion.

4. State funding

a. The State of California is responsible for allocating the right resources and they are not doing that. He fully supports going to Sacramento with the community and school board and fighting for the resources we need and we are entitled to. He is disappointed that our school district is still owed funds for Amador Elementary.

5. Builders/Developers

a. The Boulevard project was a 7-year discussion between the Army, the City, Camp Parks. All stakeholders were involved in the discussion including the Army, Camp Park’s commanders, the city and the School District. He fought hard to ensure that enough land was set aside for a school. Later, he also supported a plan to reduce the school district’s portion of the land acquisition costs to be zero. He remains committed to it.

b. He reiterated that the developers of the Boulevard have complied with all statutory laws and regulations. They have not “cheated” the system, but worked within it. That said, nothing precludes them from funding more than the minimum requirements. This is their decision to make and must be discussed with the school board.

As a final note, the mayor mentioned that he is committed to working together with the school board and the community in the right spirit and without any accusations either way. We need to work together, not in conflict.

The protestors vowed to continue their protests and engage in meaningful conversations with the school board and city council till we resolve this very difficult situation we’ve been put in.

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June 4th -Dublin Residents take it to developers to fund Schools

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